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TOPIC: Bending Notes

Bending Notes 2 years 4 months ago #124

  • greek1953
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Is it easier to bend on key of A or C harmonica?
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Bending Notes 2 years 4 months ago #125

  • Reed Smith
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Not
Last Edit: 2 years 3 months ago by Reed Smith.
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Bending Notes 2 years 4 months ago #202

  • AndyT
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What Reed said,

A few additional thoughts. I found it easier the bend the C harmonica first, especially draw four, the easiest to bend. However, as you develop, you'll have to bend on every harp you've got, and each bend requires a slightly different embrouchure. So in effect, you'll have to learn to bend on each harmonica anyway, and you may find it easier on an A than a C.

I have started overblowing, but haven't noticed a difference between harps yet, they all sound pretty scratchy.

The key thing about learning to bend is to practise with patience. I'd also suggest trying to resist the urge to force air, as its technique that does the work, not how hard the air flows, but that's easier to say than do.

Andy
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Bending Notes 2 years 4 months ago #269

  • AndyT
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I took my own advice and dug out an old neglected D harp. Bends on hole 3 needs a lot of work.

Must be why I not a fan of the higher keys. More likely I like the Bflat and A harps too much.

Andy
Last Edit: 2 years 4 months ago by AndyT. Reason: misspelling
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Bending Notes 2 years 4 months ago #274

  • Reed Smith
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@AndyT,
You are spot on in your advice , while one can achieve a bend thru force, this is THE number
cause for reed failure. A correct bend is achieved by creating the correct resonant chamber
in the mouth, regardless of the type of embouchure used.
Because both reeds activate during a bend, both the draw and blow reed in a chamber should
be gapped together, meaning, if you gap a reed, gap the corresponding reed.
Because hole 3 draw has three bends I close the blow reed gap to almost stopping, then open it
incrementally to play. In doing so you will give the bottom reed more compression which will
allow the draw bend to be hit easier with less *sag (*the moment when the other reed begins to sound).
80% of air loss in a harmonica is thru adjacent holes, while it can't be stopped entirely, a gentle breeze
is preferable to a tornado.
if you are working on your own harps, and do gapping, it is an easy enough tech tip to employ.
If you are not yet working on your harps and would like to learn, ask away here and I'll do my best to guide
you. I bought my first set of harmonica tools from F&R Farrell twenty-seven years ago.
Reed Smith
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Bending Notes 2 years 4 months ago #281

  • AndyT
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Ah Reed

By lots of work, I mean on my behalf in playing the three bend on the D harp. I can knock them off left right and centre on A, Bflat, A flat and C key harps, and mostly in the G (my most common keys played on).

I've yet to do anything more than take harps apart to clean them. But when I move to maintenance I shall come a knocking.

Andy
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